Liposuction popular with Gulf medical tourists

 

The American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery Hospital has published details of the most popular procedures in the first six months of 2016:

  • 46% liposuction
  • 18% breast surgery
  • 15% abdominoplasty
  • 11% cosmetic gynaecology
  • 10% rhinoplasty

Patients are looking to new technologies, with a rise in popularity for stem cell technology – through which patients can harvest their body’s cells to use in the future for treatments such as breast augmentation.

Botox and fillers remain in the top spot for non-invasive procedures; followed by body contouring, skin rejuvenation, face-lift and fat reduction.

The American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery Hospital was the first hospital to open in Dubai Healthcare City. Al Khayal Clinic is the cosmetic surgery department of the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery Hospital in Dubai. It offers a wide range of cosmetic treatment including liposuction, breast reduction, and Botulinum toxin. Al Loulou is the dental department and offers dental services and treatment including veneers, dental implants, and orthodontics.

It had 20,000 customers in 2015 and is on track for 28,000 patients in 2016.

For patients the source by nationality is -

  • 51% UAE
  • 12% Gulf
  • 13% MENA
  • 10% Europe
  • 14% Rest

The Gulf patients can be split into-

  • 53% Saudi Arabia
  • 19% Qatar
  • 14% Oman
  • 9% Kuwait
  • 5% Bahrain
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